Am I Too Old To Be A Sex Educator? Are My Views On Sexuality Issues Old-Fashioned?

Sexuality Issues: Am I Too Old To Be A Sex Educator?

For some time now I’ve been harbouring a worry. Am I getting too old to correctly educate others in the ways of sexuality, gender and suchlike? My worry is that I’m coming up to 40 in a few years, and perhaps I’m just not cutting-edge as a sex educator any more. Maybe I don’t have the most up to date understandings on sexuality issues. What if I get it wrong, and spread incorrect information – or offend? What if I’m just not relevant in the world of sex education anymore?

Am I Too Old To Be A Sex Educator?

To give you just one example, it was only in the past year that I realised that I actually am a feminist – something I’d previously staunchly denied. Before that, many years ago now, it took me ages to realise what things like cis, queer and gender-fluid meant. Then there’s the common call to ‘check your privilege’. Is privilege a thing? I probably wouldn’t have believed so, in the past – but now? Yes, privilege is definitely a thing.

So, what other understandings are there that I’m missing? What other sexuality issues am I just… not getting right now? Am I stuck in some old-fashioned mental ruts here?

There are so many sex educators and writers doing outstanding work enlightening others on sexuality issues. A few people who immediately spring to mind when it comes to spearheading greater understanding in areas of sexuality are Sunny Megatron, Charlie Glickman, Dangerous Lilly and Violet Blue. It seems that to be a sex educator you really must have your finger on the pulse with sexuality issues, the latest understanding of our psychological as well as physiological workings, and the most up to date facts and viewpoints.

Don’t get me wrong: I’m not trying to compete. Quite the opposite in fact! The more sex education available the better. It’s that I am worried I might still subconsciously hold sexuality related opinions that are ‘behind the times’, whether due to my age, or lack of time to research due to other commitments. I really don’t want to spread the wrong information or unintentionally intolerant views with others, whether through my blog & article writing or just in everyday chat with others. I don’t want to be that person.

Another worry is that other sex writers & bloggers may feel similarly to me – and that it might stop them speaking up on sexuality-themed topics or in discussions because they think they might ‘get it wrong’. Especially as the comfort and common anonymity found on online platforms leads to mistakes being treated far more harshly by critics than they would be in a face-to-face situation. On top of which, the lack of any intonation in writing can cause misunderstandings -and differences in sense of humour can cause offence. I know my British sense of humour has been misunderstood on more than one occasion; it’s the British way to make a joke out of anything and everything. No matter how obviously disastrous the crisis.

I guess sex education and being a sex educator is just like any other field of study; those involved are themselves always learning and experiencing growth in their horizons and opinions. It would be naivety in the extreme for me to ever announce I’d learned all I ever could about sexuality issues, that I knew all there was to know about sex, gender, pleasures of the anatomy and the complex nature of adult, sex-related psychology. It’s doubtful anyone could ever claim that or believe it, or that anyone would want to. Nobody likes a know-it-all.

My belief is that my work in sex education is simply to be open to new understandings of sex & sexuality, to promote not simply tolerance of the diversity in the world but a joyful, welcoming attitude towards it, and to be sex-positive at all times. This is how I try to live: celebrating humanity’s diversity, enthused when I’m able to learn about those differences in greater detail, and sharing my findings with my readers as and when I’m able.

Am I Too Old To Be A Sex Educator?This sex education also means not just sharing new findings, but also holding my hands up and admitting when I got it wrong in the past, or when I’m (although I hope this is never the case) unintentionally intolerant of or offensive to anyone.

My heroes in the world of sex education inspire me to keep going, because they are at the forefront of a change in the world which at times can feel as slow as evolution itself. Sharing facts is one thing but campaigning for others to adopt more tolerant attitudes towards people who might be different to themselves (if they’re for some reason unable to actively rejoice in diversity) is quite another.

I’ve nothing but the utmost respect and admiration for those who face this battle on a daily basis. Many sex educators also have to battle the harsh judgements of the world around them because of personal, sexual or lifestyle choices, or because of other facets of themselves which may not be a choice. On top of their educational work.

Am I too old to be a sex educator? Am I right to be worried that I could harbour old-fashioned views and get sex education wrong? I don’t think anyone is too old to join the fight to spread the correct information when it comes to sex & sexuality, I just have to be aware that it’s a constantly evolving thing. I won’t let my fears stop my sex education work -but I will voice them in the hope that it will keep me vigilant and alert.

 

Am I Too Old To Be A Sex Educator?

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